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the charges, miranda rights, the public safety exemption, where are we right now on that issue? >> well, the normal rule is that when someone's irsed, they're advised of their rights. you have the right to remain silent. anything you say can be used against you. you have the right to a lawyer. if you can't afford one it will be provided, that sort of thing. if police don't give that warning then they cannot use any statements of the defendant in court. the exception to that is called the public safety exception. it's been extended by judges to terrorism cases. and the idea is that if you need information quickly to preserve public safety, you can ask those questions and still use the responses in court. but that public safety exception rule is limited. it only applies for several hours after fill in the blank. we assume after questioning starts rather than after arrest. probably no more than a day, day and a half. >> where do you come up with that? pete, let me interrupt you there. who has come up with what is the time? is it just, you know it when you see it? >> in terms of the time li
miranda rights to keep him in a gray area right now whether or not he would be considered an enemy combatant or information that he would be allowing to investigators may not be used against him if he were try to be tried as an american civilian. as i talked there with roger about the fact that congressman peter king over the weekend said the homeland is the battlefield and that times have really changed, what are your thoughts about what the congressman has said about the fbi and that they may have missed red flags and the fact that the homeland is the battlefield? >> as you know, thomas, the fbi conducts thousands of interviews like this. i will say that they do a good job. i would say unless there was some evidence that would lead them to not do something to this individual, i would say they did a good job. i think my colleague, peter king, is not just monday morning quarterbacking but arm chair quarterbacking. we don't no what our investigative authorities know. i would say let them do their job. we can comment but when we start pointing fingers, i think we just add to the conf
him before he receives miranda warning is the right thing to do. a short time ago, the aclu put out a statement saying every defendant is entitled to defend miranda lights. five lawmakers want him treated as an enemy combatant. 53 people remain in boston hospitals today, three in critical condition, including a 7-year-old girl. nbc news national investigative correspondent michaels i cough is in boston, ron allen outside boston's beth israel medical center where the suspect and many of the victims are being kept and kristen we willinger at the white house, let's get to the latest on investigation. for that, we turn to michaels i cough, again, in boston. what is the fbi focusing on today and moving forward? >> reporter: federal prosecutors are focusing on drafting a criminal complaint we could see as early as this afternoon, detailing the criminal charges against him supported by an affidavit from an fbi agent that would lay out some details of the plot. not all of them but could provide crucial new information for us about what tsarnaev actually did and raise and shed some light on
understand if he is indeed conscious and does survive before reading him miranda rights; is that correct? >> i believe molly line will be talking about that a little bit as well. there is a loophole. there is a way they don't have to. so he was not read his miranda rights to allow to ask questions of him. we don't know if questions have been asked. they may have asked questions of him when he was under the situation he was in, of course being pretty seriously injured. they do believe he is going to make it. that was something, not only important for them to do that because that is what we do in this society but important because of this investigation. last night we were told he was being brought here for treatment. we weren't too far behind the ambulance. as you made your way through boston, you could see many of the businesses reopened. you saw restaurants and bars reopened. at one point there was a small college and 500 students had gone into the streets and blocked off all four lanes cheering, holding signs and as first responders and medical teams came through that had nothing to do
going that route. >> shepard: he matter of reading him his miranda rights. the right to remain silent. there's an exception put into place in 1984 and the intent was, what if somebody placed -- for instance, placed some bombs out there, brought them into custody but more bombs are about to go off you need them to be compelled to speak right now. while waiting to read them their miranda rights. that's an ambiguous thing. do you have a sense now that period of time, whatever it is, has passed and it's time for us to deal with the constitution? >> the theory behind this exception is that the puck is at risk, and the public is so much at risk that the potential defendant's constitutional liberties must be negated. but that doesn't make sense what the same people i just tick off said, the governor, mayor, police, and police commission economy head of the fbi, all said on friday night, boston's back to normal. the public is no longer at recollection. they can't have it both ways. >> shepard: they're trying to. >> can't claim bostones back to normal and the public is not at risk and then say
whether he should be read his miranda rights. >> you're giving them the option, as to whether or not they want to cooperate and i don't believe they should have that option. this is sole will i for the purpose of interrogation to find intelligence to get the intelligence that i believe we need. >> questions remain -- did the brothers have help in carrying out their attacks? >> we're satisfied that the two actors here, the two people that were committing the damage have either been arrested or killed. and the people of the city of boston can rest comfortably at this point in time. >>> but did the fbi miss warning signs after interviewing 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011? where did the brothers get their guns? their training? and their inspiration? >>> in washington, the boston terror attack could become an excuse to slow down immigration reform. >> if ways to improve the bill offered amendment when we start mark-up in may and let's vote on it. i say that particularly those pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as a -- i would say excuse for not doing th
enforcement. we know that doesn't quite work for several reasons. one, there is an exception in the miranda rights. when a suspect is read their rights by the police, we're talking about a miranda warning. there is a provision that allows in case law that allows for law enforcement to wait if they think there is a national security threat or a danger to the public until they've talked to the person and established there isn't a danger to the public or gotten the information they need. then they can read the miranda rights. that's what the fbi has done in this case. that's what they did in the new york time square bomber. that worked quite well. they talk to him for a while before they read him his rights. then they read him his rights. he kept and he provided very valuable information. we know that the traditional civilian court system founded by the founding fathers can work in this situation. >> let me ask you a couple questions. if the russian government was so concerned about tamerlan as to alert our fbi and our government, and warrant an investigation of him, why are we so sure that dz
with as a consequence as an enemy combatant or enemy belligerent which would involve delaying his miranda rights. >> you don't want to turn over intelligence gathering over to a criminal attorney. under the law, there is no right to legal counsel when you are egg being questioned for national security purposes. i hope the obama administration will allow us that and they have a bad track record. >> and this is not the course the administration will take. they will take reading him his rights after national security exception has run out and prosecuting him in a federal court as well. >> molly: thank you. >> megyn: more breaking news. news reporting that federal charges have now been filed against the surviving suspect. though they are reportedly being filed under seal. that means we don't get to see them. they will have to let it's know what the charges are but perhaps not all the supporting information. in a case of this magnitude there is no way they are going to keep the charges private and not public. in other words, what exactly has he been charged with? a terrorist act, using weapons of mass destru
can he be questioned before the public safety runs out, most say 48 hours. once under miranda he is under no obligation to cooperate with authorities. >> remember the number one goal right here is to get inside his head and get whatever intelligence he has with any operatives in the united states to protect the homeland and protect americans inside the united states. >> reporter: speaking this morning on fox news, former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzales suggested being mirandized will not necessarily close off the flow of information from tsnaraev. >> we have something we can give him which is his life. for example, taking the death penalty off the i believe at that. there is possible some kind of deal would be made where he provides information and in exchange for that the government gives him some kind of a plea agreement. >> reporter: gonzalez suspects what may be happening now is in the obama administration is a quote, interagency scrum where some are pushing for a quick mirandizing. others may be advocating a delay so as much information as possible can be garnered, ma
'll give him a lawyer, lawyer up, get miranda. >> oh, yeah. now, a couple of things about that. they have suggested that there's an exception to miranda for public safety which we all know there is. i think they've been very extravagant in assuming they'll get the largest possible exception under the law and the reality is in different circuits that exception is interpreted differently. >> if they think they don't have to give the guy the miranda rights, you have the right to remain silent and right to an attorney, they think we have a big exemption, before they wofer that and try to get all of the information from the person and it may come back to bite them because some jurisdictions don't see it that way. >> absolutely right. in some places if you're a dangerous offender you get a long exception. in others, it doesn't matter how dangerous you are, if police basically rendered you-- >> what should happen. if we identify the person what do you think as a doj think next. >> in the person fits the definition of enany combatant, al-qaeda affiliate or someone we're at war with, that presiden
miranda rights and there is it a safety exception that allows you 48 hour to see if there is any bombs that may be connected with the attack. under the law of war, an enemy combatant and someone who takes up arms against this country, including an american citizen can be held for intelligence purposes without a lawyer and miranda warningings. the best way to get information from the suspect is hold him as an enemy combatant. it a terrorist attack and not a common crime. in 30 days he would be presented before a federal judge and the judge could review the case that the government has. i am urging this administration, please do not lawyer him up tomorrow night. you have under our statutes and supreme court cases,le authority to hold him as an enemy combatant ting gather intelligence about what is coming our way in the future. >> there is great relief in boston today but a lot of people are concern body what might be to come whether it is it inspired by the actions or a connection, we really don't know the answer to that question yet, do we senator? >> it is impossible between now and to
controversy over miranda rights now pretty much moot. he's been read his rights. he has a lawyer. so that -- that part of the controversy seems to be -- that part of the issue seems to be put aside at this moment. >> let me go to don, michael. when you read the complaint and it says about their homemade bombs, let's go back to what michael was just talking about in the ieds. the complaint says they threw at least two small improvised explosive devices, ieds, out of the car and intact low-grade device was discovered inside the car in addition from the scene of the shootout. the fbi has recovered two unexploded ieds as well as the remnants of numerous exploded ieds. now, does this say to you, when we read numerous exploded ieds, does that support the idea that they planned more attacks to you, don? >> well, you know, al, i think right off the bat, when you look at this circumstance here, clearly this was a planned attack. it not only was a planned attack by the activities that they went about, but if you go back and look, years and months gone back at how these people operated and so o
reading him miranda rights. what does that mean for any information they might be getting? >> well, it's very important to the people -- we've been talking a lot about miranda and i think it's important for people to understand what it does and doesn't mean. if you are questioned without your miranda rights, all that means is that the statements you make cannot be used against you in a criminal court. they can be used against other people. they can be used as leads to other inquiries. and you can still be prosecuted with lots of other evidence. all it means is that those statements cannot be used against you. from what it certainly appears there is lots of other evidence against this fellow. so the fact that the government might be giving up the chance to use some of it is not much of a sacrifice on the part of the government. >> he also at this point could indicate he wants an attorney and doesn't want to answer any questions, correct? >> absolutely. even when someone doesn't get miranda rights, the statements still have to be voluntary. he can't be tortured. he can't be waterboarded.
. not everybody, but some. miranda rights. we've watched enough detective shows no know, police shows, they give miranda rights almost like blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. it's done. why do you think that's an issue? now we just got the word as we went on the air tonight the defendant here, the suspect, i guess he's a defendant now, has been given his miranda rights. >> this is truly something of an urban legend. people like to watch shows where a criminal goes free because he wasn't given miranda rights. that's extremely rare. i do criminal defense work. i can tell you, the most you can hope for in a miranda case is one or two statements will not make it into court. it's rare the whole case falls out unless everything -- >> so it's not the poison fruit thing? >> there is a poison fruit provision, standard. but it's very rare for it to pollute an entire case. >> let me ask you practically, why don't the law enforcement officials, the federal officials up there who have him in custody at the hospital, why didn't they just do this as soon as they could? >> in my view they should. i have serious prob
be read his miranda rights. moving past the politics of it because it seems to get a little poe lit kal, as a former member of fbi how does whether or not the suspect is read his miranda rights influence or impact your investigation? >> it really becomes irrelevant. good report-based interviewers and interrogators who are the ones most effective. the fbi doesn't do that because we're nice. we do that because it worked. in reported based interviewers miranda they can read that and continue. it is not a major obstacle. it is almost irrelevant. jenna: really? we're hearing a it is a major issue whether we get to the bottom of this investigation. so what should we consider as we continue to hear the debate ongoing over the next several days? >> it doesn't, it really doesn't make that much difference to the interviewers and especially the particular group of profile he is -- profilers they developed at quantico, at the fbi academy. this is not terribly relevant. they can sit down with the people. they can interview them. they look for behavioral cues. they look for a way to establish a relat
suspect as enemy combat tant. remember, he wasn't read his miranda rights. what would it mean? and why is it important? the constitutional attorney will weigh in on this when we come back. morning, brian! loveour passat! um. listen, gary. i bought the lt one. nice try. says right here you can get one for $199 a month. you can't believe the lame-stream media, gary. they're all gone. maybe i'll get one. [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. you can't have the same car as me, gary! i'm gett' one. nope! [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto-insurance
today at his hospital bedside and read his miranda rights, that was an important moment in this test. because while there is more to this test than this moment, we did learn in this moment they are going to try this guy according to our laws and values, as a sloppy criminal he is alleged to be. joining me at the table don borelli and vince warren. it's great to have you both here. so i refer to unnamed trolls, republican senators who were calling for enemy combatant to be applied to this 19-year-old suspect. i want to play a little bit of sound from senator lindsey graham who was probably the most outspoken about this. take a listen. >> i believe our nation is at war. the enemy is radical islam, defined as the taliban, al qaeda, and affiliated groups. the question i have regarding this case, is there any association between these two individuals and the groups i just named to allow enemy combatant status to be conferred upon the suspect in boston. >> don, you and i were talking about this a lot last week as the investigation was unfolding. >> right. >> what is your reaction to that?
not get his miranda rights. >> among of group of republicans calling for the boston bombing suspect to be considered an enemy combatant. that means he would not have the same constitutional protection as a regular citizen, with regard to what he says as the investigation moves forward. will this happen? california congressman, a senior member of the intelligence committee. congressman, always good to see you. i know that you disagree with the congressman and think that the suspect is in custody. is entitled to his miranda rights. why? >> well, i think the administration is handling it exactly correct. there is a public safety exception under the miranda allowing law enforcement to interview him, making sure there are no other bombs, threats, perpetrators still out there giving the law enforcement flexibility to do the that prior to miranda and i think the court will interpret it broadly and give them the time they need to make sure that the public is safe. after that, he will have to be mirandized, doesn't mean the end of cooperation, but no basis yet to conclude they should be trea
gathering purposes since he's been president. when we read these people their miranda rights and give them a lawyer the only way you can gather intelligence is if the terror suspect and the lawyer will allow you to do so. intelligence gathering through plea bargaining is not going to make us safe. jenna: so we spoke to a former member of the fbi on our show yesterday that seems to not have a problem with miranda rights, that is their opinion. we'll see what they get as far as information from this one suspect. >> can i mention something. jenna: please. >> i don't have a problem with miranda rights. this man can only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to
washington, the decision to read the boston bombing suspect his miranda rights. last hour, lindsay graham and kel i iote said is there is no way a defense lawyer is going to let dzhokar tsarnaev talk any more without taking the death penalty off the table. he has been in custody for 60 hours which the feds decided to read him his miranda rates. joining us is mercedes cowlin and you had such different reactions to this. right is ticked off that his miranda rights were yesterday red to him. he can't speak we're told like a one word, yes or one word no, the left is ticked off it took him as long as it did to read the miranda rights. >> first of all, i to give kudos for calling it an act of terrorism to the obama administration like they called hassan workplace violence. bottom line, if they don't want to use the statements a this guy makes in a criminal prosecution, they can ask him questions all day long without murnd. they can do it after he gets a lawyer as long as a clean team, a team that is is not involved in the criminal prosecution goes in and asks intelligence related questions that
, they suspended his miranda rights for a 48 hour period and decide whether or not to seek the death penalty -- listen to this from last night as well. >> this is still an active and ongoing investigation. we're going to be reviewing all of the evidence. before that kind of a decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty, you review all of the evidence and it's a very thoughtful, long process that is engaged and it's the attorney general of the department of justice that makes that final decision. >> martha: all right. so there you have that. let's bring in fox news legal analyst peter johnson, jr. peter, welcome. >> how are you? >> martha: that's the u.s. attorney on this case in boston. she says it's too early to talk about death penalty. >> i was really surprised and disturbed as an american and as a lawyer in watching that last night. you couldn't think of a more weak insip mid remark that she was making. the charges that will be filed in this case, i haven't seen them, but i can approximate what they are -- are death penalty charges under federal law, including u
, as well. mccain and graham says the injured suspect is not entitled to his miranda rights. they want him to be treated as an enemy combatant. it's a non-debate for him. the mother-in-law she is sickened by the horror inflicted. the family realizes now they never really new tamerian tsarnaev, the suspect number one and cannot begin to comprehend this tragedy. we are all over the developments including something going on in the city of chicago. more on that in a second. here is what we got for you now. mike tobin in watertown, massachusetts. what is the latest on the investigation there. ed henry at the white house responding to all these crosscurrents everywhere. to eric shawn where the injured suspect remains not surprisingly under heavy guard. mike? >> reporter: neil, this is the i dill i can neighborhood where it came to an end in a blaze of gunfire. the view of the helicopter pilot had there was someone hiding in that boat. he was wounded and bleeding, dzhokar tsarnaev half an hour from the cover of night that could have allowed him to move again. there were federal agents and guns dr
and lucid enough to get his miranda rights read to him, also thoughts he shot himself through the neck, that's been really brought into question now, as an eyewitness there to help take him down, looks like a cut or maybe something exploded, a shrapnel cut, those that the boston marathon, those that suffered during the explosion. he said i'm motivated by religion, that religion being islamic extremism or islam. he went on to say i have no outside ties. i'm not part of a larger group. isn't that convenient. >>steve: both brothers went to a mosque in cambridge. it was the older brother. clearly the younger brother was following the older brother in life in so many different ways. we told you a little bit yesterday about some of the outbursts the older brother had at the mosque in cambridge. for instance, back in november where they were talking about it was okay for muslims to celebrate american holidays like thanksgiving and the 4th of july and tamerlan, the older brother, stood up and argued. then in january there was a praise for martin luther king jr. and he got up and called someone a hyp
okayed the suspension of the suspect's miranda rights. is that a temporary suspension? >> reporter: yes, by law it is. it's called the public safety exception to the miranda rule. normally you have to tell someone they have a right to remain silent and if you don't, then you can't use anything they tell you in court. so that's why the miranda warning is given. but there is an exception. you don't have to do it if there's a possible threat to public safety. and here obviously there's a concern about whether there are potential accomplices. investigators say they haven't found any. or other explosives. they say they haven't found any of those either but that's what they want to ask him. and this exception probably begins to expire the moment you invoke it so it's probably no good for more than a day or two but nonetheless they can do that. afterwards they'll have to give him his miranda warning and say whether he'll continue to answer questions. the justice department says even in very serious cases like this, most people in custody do continue to talk. >> pete, who's going to be interrog
's before he gets the miranda rights. the fact that he can't speak right now, does that push back that window of time because they're not getting anything from him? >> that's a good question that i won't speculate on without a legal background. i'll leave that one up to the master pete williams. but i can imagine there's got to be some sort of gray area there that some lawyer could look at. on that point, though, i think it's interesting, where we've gone now from, alex, is we've gone from this, all right, what exactly happened, to these real sort of questions surrounding the national security of this country, and how exactly these two individuals were able to go forward with what they ultimately accomplished. so this morning, sort of around that point, talking to folks related to the house homeland security committee, they say they really want to sort of get this investigation rolling on why these two individuals seem to have slipped through the u.s. intelligence community, especially after that information reported yesterday that the russians were concerned about the older broth
. >> gregg: we have toe concerned about miranda rights -- that is irrelevant. there is plethora of evidence and he allegedly confessed to the carjacking. so what do you want to do is fi out other planned attacks and accomplices? >> absolutely. you want to find out who was involved in a broader plan, if there is a broader plan. at were all the bombs that were thrown athe police, where were they slated for and is there anybody else lurking i the wings? the trick will be to chip to his heart and who is close to heart andse the leverage. misrepresent the facts, they will be arrested. >> gregg: the supreme court has said so. >> one thousand percent. this is the perfect scenario. all the leverage is on the side of the investigators. he has no idea. he is 19. he is dumb as rocks. he failed six out of seven classes in college. he forgott surveillance video existed in america by the bombing on monday. he is naive and impressionable. they can get to i am. >> gregg: you want to look at all electronic communications and personal property and his car. anybody he might have communicated with. >> it's ong
time now we have a suspect who already was read his miranda rights. he already have a lawyer present. and i don't think that should affect any trained interrogator, any trained interviewer in doing their job. we have been doing this for many, many years. we did it against terrorist suspects, organized crimes, people who are charged with treason, spies, and it always worked, and it always gets the intended results. >> in terms of this breaking news that we've just got tonight. again, this is a senior government official saying that the initial interrogation of dzhokhar tsarnaev in his hospital bed, he says that he and his brother were not in touch with any overseas terrorists or groups. they conceived the attack on their own, motivated he told them by religious fervor. that's the language that i have been given. how -- how should that be approached in terms of strategically trying to unwind any threats that might exist beyond these young men? they're saying they acted alone. but presumably, the thing that made them want to do this could make other people want to do this as well. >> su
asked if he understood what was happening. his miranda rights were read to him. they decided to read him his miranda rights. those were given to him today as well. the security here is very tight. in fact, what is interesting is, he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are also here recovering. greta? >> adam, in terms what have went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or anybody in the last couple of days since he was taken into custody? did he give him information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> reporter: we learned a cowl of things. 1; yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours if not more than that, they were worried about making sure should thguy survives. he got here on friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled from injuries nearly 20 hours. he was obviously in rough condition. so the number-1 priority was to make sure he survived to get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said of course, they are not going to give away what he sa
. and his miranda rights were read to him. there was reporting if they weren't going to, but they decided to read him his miranda rights and those were given to him today as well. the security here is still very tight. what is interesting is he potentially might get out of the hospital later than many of his victims that are here also recovering. greta. >> adam, in terms of what went down before he was mirandized, was he interviewed by the fbi or by anybody in the last couple days since he was taken into custody? and it he give them information that they considered valuable and helpful? >> we learned a couple of things. yes, there were questions asked of him. the first few hours, if not more than that, obvious think they were making sure he survived so you had that situation. he got here friday night in pretty bad condition. he bled for nearly 24 hours and then the fire fight at the boat. the number one priority for them was to make sure he survived so they could get information from him. questions were asked of him before he was mirandized. they haven't said, of course, because it's part
-value suspects is standing by to question him. officialsofficials have said thl not read him his miranda right, invoking the rare public safety exception. dozens remain hospitalized. the death toll is 3 people from the bombing and 1 others wiewbed. they are also believed to have shot a police officer, marking a forth killing. "fox news sunday" is right after america's news headquarters, and there will be more on boston police commissioner. the investigation enters a new phase as agents focus on getting answers from dzhokhar tsarnaev to questions like and how why and continuing to investigate whether anyone else was involved. michael sullivan is very familiar with these kinds of investigations, he is a former u.s. attorney who prosecuted would-be shoe bomber richard reid. thank you for joining us today. >> you're welcome, shannon. >> shannon: put on your legal cap for the first couple of questions. how do you think it's appropriate to best treat the suspect to really bar future legal challenges against any information that the government could get from him at this point and stay within the conf
-called public safety exception to the miranda rule where for some period of time, it's not entirely clear how long, a suspect can be questioned without miranda warnings and that apparently is what's happening here. again, it's complicated somewhat by the fact that we didn't know exactly what tsarnaev's medical condition is and how many questions he can answer. apparently he's answering some questions in writing. so i don't really see lindsey graham's proposal as all that differentwhat's going on now. he seems to suggest a longer process of questioning him, but the obama administration has also committed to some period of questioning. now, this all assumes that he's willing to answer questions. can he always samp simply say it answering questions and there is no way either under enemy combatant rules or in the criminal justice system to force someone to answer questions who doesn't want to answer them. >> the argument i guess is under this limited questioning period before he is formally advised of his miranda rights, he has and right to an attorney, doesn't have to answer any questions. there
to not read him his miranda rights immediately so he doesn't have the right to remain silent to make sure there is no other plot out there. and senators put out a statement saying we remain under threat from radical islam and hope the obama administration will consider the enemy combatant option. that means is that this suspect if recovers could be spent down to the military court system. the president signaled the open it? a statement saying what he believes distinguishes america is that we have our own civilian court system. so he's getting pressure tonight he is signaling he'll probably put him, if he survives. >> ed henry live this saturday morning. last time we heard from authorities the news was not good. authorities came to the microphone, told people they'd not been able to find a second suspect they were lifting shelter in place order but there are questions about this this investigation was going and then, just minutes later they located a second suspect in watertown. the area they'd been combing all day long. mike tobin with news he's live this morning. mike, end of this thing
understand he has not been read his miranda rights, even if he can talk. what's the latest from the hospital? >> the latest official word from the hospital and through the f.b.i., the official channels releasing information is he's in serious condition and within the last 24 hours, that he's also in stable condition. so he is under the care of the physician here, clearly under heavy guard. we know he was shot in the throat because senator in the select intelligence committee has also given that information out. but that's really what we know for certain at this point in time. >> gretchen: there is this report this morning that maybe that throat wound was from an attempted suicide when the police were closing in on him, as you can see from the thermal imings of him in the boat friday night. what have you heard about that? >> well, that information doesn't come from the positions here -- physicians that are treating him and would have the closest eye view of his wounds. they're keeping all of his information to themselves as they're required to do by law and the f.b.i. not releasing that throu
news tsarnaev will not be given a miranda warning when he's physically able to be interrogated after receiving medical treatment. instead, the official says the government will invoke a legal rule known as the public safety exception. that will allow investigators to question tsarnaev without first advising him of his right to remain silent and be afforded legal counsel. president obama used his weekly address today to praise law enforcement and those involved in tracking tsarnaev down. >> americans refused to be terrorized. ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain, the stories of heroism and kindness, resolve and resilience, generosity, and love. >> authorities caught up with the suspect after a tip from a watertown resident. he was hiding in a boat parked outside a home. he is now in a boston hospital and nbc's ron allen is joining me from there. ron, with a good afternoon to you, let's get the very latest on his condition. are you getting word from the hospital or are they staying somewhat silent on that? >> reporter: absolutely silent, alex.
, let me come over to you, a lot of talk about miranda. but give me a sense of what the leeway is especially in situations like this, after acts like what happened here at the marathon. >> well, it is yesterday's news. he's been given his miranda warnings and probably anything he said without his miranda warnings is not going to be needed by the government or the prosecution. remember, they did not indict him as a terrorist, that's very important. they indicted him as an ordinary murderer, anybody who wants to kill their mother-in-law, business partner and makes an improvised explosive device and kills them is just as guilty under the statute indicted as osama bin laden might be. this is not a terrorist prosecution. they don't have to prove intent to terrorize, intent to intimidate. they can prove their case just through the videotapes. now, i predict there are going to be two types of possible defenses in this case. number one, the jihad defense. i did it, i'm proud, i'm happy, please kill me, i want to join my brother in paradise. i'm a martyr. the other, my brother made me d
department official says tsarnaev will not be read his miranda rights because the government is invoking a public safety exception. that exception is triggered when police have an objectively reasonable need to protect the police or the public from immediate danger. tsarnaev will be questioned by a special federal interrogation team for high-value suspects. >> president barak obama and republicans used their weekly addresses to celebrate the resolve americans demonstrated after the attack on the boston marathon. in the address obama emphsized that "the world witnessed one sure and steadfast truth: americans refuse to be terrorized." >> ultimately, that's what we'll remember from this week. that's what will remain. stories of heroism and kindness; resolve and resilience; generosity and love. in the days to come, we will remain vigilant as a nation. and i have no doubt the city of boston and its surrounding communities will continue to respond in the same proud and heroic way that they have thus far - and their fellow americans will be right there with them every step of the way. may god b
charges carry the death penalty as a maximum sentence. tsarnaev was read his miranda rights in a brief bedside session in the intensive care unit at boston's beth israel hospital. the appearance began when a magistrate judge asked a doctor whether he was alert saying you can rouse him. according to a transcript of the appearance, tsarnaev nodded for times to questions but spoke just one word. when asked can you afford a lawyer, he answered simply -- no. the government says it has photographic evidence placing tsarnaev and his brother at the scene of the bombings as well as physical evidence tying them to the attacks. in the complaint the fbi says that at 2:38 p.m. on the day of the bombings, 11 minutes before the first bomb went off, a surveillance camera shows dzhokhar and tamerlan tsarnaev walking toward the boston marathon finish line with backpacks. then a surveillance camera mounted on the restaurant nearby captures crucial pieces of evidence. seven minutes before the first bombing the video which still hasn't been released shows dzhokhar walking toward the second bombing site. th
tsarnaev was read his miranda rights and nodded yet. the only word he spoke other than that was no when asked if he can afford a lawyer. congress will be briefed today. the complaint says when the first bomb went off every head turned towards the explosion except for tsarnaev. he walks away without his nap sack. tsarnaev told investigators he and his brother acted alone prompted by their religion and learned how to make bombs on the internet. one friend of the brother says they are shocked they are suspects. >> they never showed signs of any violence or wanting to harm people. they were great members of our society. i remember a great friendly giant. he cared for people. more on the reserved side. they respected life at one point and i don't know what happened. >> joining me from boston is michael tracking the new leads and joining the fvgz former white house counter terrorism official, an nbc analyst. it is good to have you here. i think you can hear what the mom is saying and also what friends are saying. i want to start with you because we have homeland security secr
, about miranda warnings, about habeas corpus, how fast do we have to release him or how fast do we have to put them in front of a judge or how long can we keep them and question them? >> bill: these are all great points. let me slow you down just a moment here. >> sure. sorry. >> bill: if you want -- if you want to go out and make an arrest, perhaps you have your eye on someone and you got a street address, apartment number. but maybe there is more than one person. maybe there is two or three. and there is a real danger in putting out public information. if you could be showing your hand and tipping off others that could be people that you want to talk to. that's the category and area that could be very dangerous. >> another possibility here is that the boston police department jumped the gun. the f.b.i., my understanding, is in control of the situation, and believe me, there is a real higher arcky throughout the country when the feds come in, they come in and they take over and they're the chain of command, they're at the top. if someone, some lower police officer blew -- said somethin
, these are terrorists that attacked the boston marathon. look, i have no doubt under obama they will get their miranda rights read to them, but should they? >> if they are declared enemy combat evans, are we dealing with domestic or foreign origin. are we naturalized is the sense of the united states which we have seen in other individuals who have committed acts of terror against the united states. if they are anne
interrogation group. they are skilled. they know how to do this. the miranda right can be read at a later time. >> reporter: lawmakers agree it's important to gather intelligence from him to save more american lives. that investigation continues. meantime the victims continue to mourn. this morning a private funeral for 29-year-old crystal campbell will be laid to rest just outside of boston. at 11:50 a.m. our time that is when a moment of silence will be held. live in the newsroom brian flores. >>> tonight runners in marin county will honor victims of the boston bombings. they will take part in a 2.5- mile race that begins at 6:45 at ross park. runners are encouraged to wear blue and yellow clothing. the official colors of the boston marathon. for more information on the boston bombings you can go to our website ktvu.com to see a special section with more details and information. >>> time is 6:03. the furloughs of air traffic controllers has started. tara moriarty is live at sfo now to tell us how travelers are reacting. tara. >> reporter: a lot of the passengers we have been speaking to this
yesterday applauding the suspension of miranda rights for the teenage suspect. he even suggested we haven't gone far enough. and advocated for labeling the suspect an enemy combatant. by defining this week's events as terrorism, we endow the violence with political meaning. when we call their homemade bombs but not adam lanza's bush master xm 15 rifle weapons of mass destruction, we sent out a trajectory for the prosecution when we focus on months that one suspect spent overseas rather than the years that both spent in the u.s. we assume a limited geography for the incubation of evil. so here we go. the crisis is over and the politics begin. folks, this is actually the most dangerous part. with me at the table today is msnbc contributor and georgetown university professor, michael eric dyson. valerie core, a writer and fi filmmak filmmaker. co-host of the cycle and robert pape, director of the project security and -- >> bb, let me start with you. what do you think happened this week? >> what i think happened is we had homegrown terrorism come to the united states. since 9/11, this is the
that they don't have to read him his miranda rights right away. as time passes, does the justification for that exception grow weaker? are they on ls strong ground? >> it sure does, because as you know, miranda rights are a bedrock constitutional principle. we all have the right to remain silent, t get an attorney and be advised of those rights. the public safety exemption is a very narrow exemption. there has to be an imminent threat to the public. it certainly seems less imminent. >> don't officials who say the terror is over, don't they kind of undercut that argument, and does it really matter in the end? >> this is certainly an argument that's going to be handed to this defendant's defense attorney when that time comes. there have been contradictory statements made that there is no public threat, there is no ticking bomb, thank goodness, apparently, based on what we know so far. so we're giving them an argument to use later. >> the issue is, the questioning that's permitted without miranda is very narrow in scope, correct? >> yes. it's about what the public threat is. it's not all
reading him his miranda rights. and altogether more formation however, the obama administration pointed out that they cannot charge as enemy combat, because the bombing suspect is a u.s. citizen. >> a memorial service was held yesterday's four lingi lu another victim chris campbell was laid to rest earlier in the day. a moment of silence was held to rob the victims'. the boston mayor except the american flag that have flown at half staff of the marathon finish line. it was symbolic transition at the fbi had a busy boston corridor crime scene back over to the city. >> the invitees police officer and was killed lay to rest tomorrow. vice- president joe biden is expected to attend. meanwhile wilson street will be open to residents and business owners tomorrow. >> we will continue to bring you the latest updates on the suspect in the victim of the boston marathon. >> coming up at 815 we have legal analyst jim hammer into talk more about charges of the 19 year-old faces. >> iran is deny any link to the two suspects started plotting a terrorist attack against canadian passenger train. canadia
they not have read his miranda rights to him yesterday if that is the case? do you leave the door of legal opportunity open a while longer. >> there are two separate issues. the public safety exception applies regardless of the type of offense that the government is investigating, and using the public safety exception is recognized by the united states supreme court. it's a lawful way of trying to get information in a very short window of time tinge le particularly when you're concerned about public safety issues as the investigators certainly were as a result of the horrific acts that the bombing suspects, the bombing defendants who are h are accused of. bill: this is a guy to lived here more than ten years. came here 2002 if memory serves. your case with richard reid he was far from an american citizen, he was far from even making a home here. what have we done in 12 years? make sure that the prosecutions can be successful? >> i would suggest that we should be using all the tools that both the united states supreme court has indicated are available in order to keep america safe, and all
suspect, what changes about me legally? >> everything. the fifth amendment, mayor randa -- miranda rights, in terms of being so identified as someone who was being looked at and so he is probably interviewed as a witness, as a victim. but at the same time, and it's constitutional, give american authorities the right to look at every part of his life if they get lawful subpoenas. i'm confident the f.b.i. will get this guy. 1-800-494-tips. >> brian: thanks. coming up straight ahead, our next guest recorded history. pictures from the attack, a photographer in the boston globe here live next. >> steve: our coverage continues of the boston bombings. but there are other stories. first of all, a fox news alert. a u.s. marine helicopter crashed -- has crashed in south korea overnight near the north korean border. all 21 people on board are alive and being treated at the hospital. the military says the super stallion chapper made a hard landing while conducting routine flight operations. the crew is from okinawa in japan. >>> a short time ago, a major earthquake in iran, killing at least 40 people
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